Hurston/Wright: Legacy Award Winners

The Hurston/Wright Foundation held it’s annual Legacy Award ceremony last weekend. While I’m not certain as to whether winners received a plaque, certificate, or money, the list of nominees weren’t surprising or unheard of. Fiction nominees included Tayari Jones, National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, Colson Whitehead, and Danzy Senna, to name a few. The fiction and non-fiction award winners are featured below:

Mr. Fox by Helen OyeyemiFairy-tale romances end with a wedding, and the fairy tales don’t get complicated. In this book, the celebrated writer Mr. Fox can’t stop himself from killing off the heroines of his novels, and neither can his wife, Daphne. It’s not until Mary, his muse, comes to life and transforms him from author into subject that his story begins to unfold differently. Mary challenges Mr. Fox to join her in stories of their own devising; and in different times and places, the two of them seek each other, find each other, thwart each other, and try to stay together, even when the roles they inhabit seem to forbid it. Their adventures twist the fairy tale into nine variations, exploding and teasing conventions of genre and romance, and each iteration explores the fears that come with accepting a lifelong bond. Meanwhile, Daphne becomes convinced that her husband is having an affair, and finds her way into Mary and Mr. Fox’s game. And so Mr. Fox is offered a choice: Will it be a life with the girl of his dreams, or a life with an all-too-real woman who delights him more than he cares to admit? (Read an excerpt)

Courage to Dissent by Tomiko Brown-NaginThe Civil Rights movement that emerged in the United States after World War II was a reaction against centuries of racial discrimination. In this sweeping history of the Civil Rights movement in Atlanta–the South’s largest and most economically important city–from the 1940s through 1980, Tomiko Brown-Nagin shows that the movement featured a vast array of activists and many sophisticated approaches to activism. Long before “black power” emerged and gave black dissent from the mainstream civil rights agenda a new name, African Americans in Atlanta debated the meaning of equality and the steps necessary to obtain social and economic justice. This groundbreaking book uncovers the activism of visionaries–both well-known legal figures and unsung citizens–from across the ideological spectrum who sought something different from, or more complicated than, “integration.” Local activists often played leading roles in carrying out the integrationist agenda of the NAACP, but some also pursued goals that differed markedly from those of the venerable civil rights organization. Brown-Nagin discusses debates over politics, housing, public accommodations, and schools. She documents how the bruising battle over school desegregation in the 1970s, which featured opposing camps of African Americans, had its roots in the years before Brown v. Board of Education.

Read more about the finalists and nominees at the Hurston/Wright website. Happy reading, y’all.

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One thought on “Hurston/Wright: Legacy Award Winners

  1. I love Tayari Jones I’ve read all her books. I plan to read the zombie apocoloypse storiy by Colon .Whitehead he’s another author I’m interested in. Good luck to all the talented authors .

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