Stephen King said he’s not feeling writer Stephenie Meyer’s Twlight series. Interestingly enough, a fellow reader friend of mind shared this same “bad writing” opinion with me sometime ago. I wouldn’t know and the book isn’t on my reading list (which means I’ll never know). Sorry. Popular doesn’t mean Pulitzer, but is King wrong for bashing another author? Read more:

According to Stephen, “Both Rowling and Meyer, they’re speaking directly to young people… The real difference is that Jo Rowling is a terrific writer and Stephenie Meyer can’t write worth a darn. She’s not very good.”

While Stephen may not be a fan of Stephenie’s writing, he understands the appeal of the series.

“People are attracted by the stories, by the pace and in the case of Stephenie Meyer, it’s very clear that she’s writing to a whole generation of girls and opening up kind of a safe joining of love and sex in those books. It’s exciting and it’s thrilling and it’s not particularly threatening because it’s not overtly sexual.”

He further explains, “A lot of the physical side of it is conveyed in things like the vampire will touch her forearm or run a hand over skin, and she just flushes all hot and cold. And for girls, that’s a shorthand for all the feelings that they’re not ready to deal with yet.” (source)

Happy reading, y’all.

UPDATE: I found another interesting news story to add to this post.

Stephenie Meyer sold more books in 2008 than any other author (22 million, according to her publisher) and did what no else — not even J.K. Rowling — has done in the 15 years of USA TODAY’s Best-Selling Books list:

She swept the four top slots in 2008’s best sellers with her Twilight series about a romance between a girl (mortal) and boy (vampire).

In a year when publishers and booksellers struggled with a dismal economy, Meyer carried the holidays, accounting for about one in every five books sold since Thanksgiving. Her dominance has continued this year.

“Rowling’s achievement over seven (Harry Potter) books remains singular — for now,” says Michael Cader, founder of Publishers Lunch, a daily e-newsletter. “But Meyer had an astounding year and played as important a role for retailers.” (Read full article)

So I guess King’s opinion really doesn’t matter.

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